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Honorees






First Prize


Engaging the Everyday
Hannah Teicher | UBC School of Architecture | Vancouver, BC

“If carefully crafted design were to infiltrate large and small pieces of the built fabric, popping up in the ageing subdivision, the gas station, and the freeway off-ramp, the architectural profession might find itself operating on a scale unprecedented in North America. Architects have no absolute responsibility to engage the general public, but in so doing they might first and foremost fulfill a responsibility to themselves, addressing an innate desire to expand their opportunity to practice. Architects espousing vastly divergent ideologies might be able to commonly support an architectural version of the Hippocratic Oath, which charges thoughtful design with supplanting rudimentary building to the greatest extent possible.”






Second Prize


Foundations of Understanding
Melissa Woehr | Charles R. Myer and Partners | Boston, MA

“An image that greatly disturbed me recently appeared in my email inbox. Forcing itself against the borders of the snapshot was a ‘stunning Tudor-inspired colonial with contemporary flair,’ which my cousin hoped to purchase. The house was a suburban McMansion in all its hyper-scaled and ornamented glory. What I saw in the realtor’s photo was a green lawn that would leach poison down the asphalt cul-de-sac, a stranded mother with only her SUV and miles of highway to connect her to the outside world, and a cut-and-paste mishap of a façade. I lamented the loss of another family member to the dark side. I shared the picture, its flamboyant caption, and giggles of agony with my coworkers. I avoided writing to my dear cousin.”






Honorable Mention


A Revolution is Not a Dinner Party
Sevra Davis | Architectural Association, London | San Francisco, CA

“Creativity will not survive, let alone flourish, in a vacuum. Creativity thrives on experimentation and multiplicity. Architects, who rely on creativity and innovation for their spirit, must commit themselves to a design process that values public engagement. The next generation of architects will not subscribe to the cult of the individual, but to the vigor of collaboration; and the next generation of the public will add value and insight to new forms and ideas in architecture. Expanded knowledge and public engagement will not be the end of architecture, but its future.”






Honorable Mention


Listening to Learn, Learning to Lead
Crystal Bowman | Leachville, AR

“We must learn to talk to our clients in a language that communicates our passion and enthusiasm for affecting lasting change in our own communities. We must also learn to listen carefully to what our clients are really saying without injecting our own preconceptions. Only when our clients know we understand and respect what they are telling us, can we open up a dialogue that will give us an opportunity to demonstrate our ability to meet their needs and expectations.”






Honorable Mention


Of Wine and Parking Lots
Kisha Patterson | Buffalo, NY

“When we graduate from architecture school, the possibilities of architecture are still fresh in our minds. I think that young professionals have the unique opportunity to share this enthusiasm. We should talk about it, casually while we’re sipping Shiraz, but we must also seek a wider audience. As good citizens, we should look for chances to talk to our block club, or Girl Scout troop. We should enter essay contests, even if the topic isn’t strictly architectural. We should submit opinions to the local paper, even blog about our experiences. We should do whatever it takes to the start the conversation.”


Semifinalists

The essay competition committee identified 30 of the 179 entrants as semifinalists. In addition to the URL corresponding to each semifinalist, all 179 essays are accessible below and available for your perusal and reference. Click here to read the official announcement of semifinalists, as appeared in the April 8 issue of ArchVoices newsletter.



    Reality Architecture
    David Barry | City of San Jose | San Jose, CA




    Band-Aids and Bomb Shelters: questioning the everydayness of architecture
    Zachary Benedict | Ball State University | Muncie, IN




    Campaigning for Architecture: The necessity to nurture Public Relations
    Shibani Bose | Gaborone, Botswana




    Listening to Learn, Learning to Lead
    Crystal Bowman | Leachville, AR




    The Suburbs of Babel
    Tim Brochu | Somerville, MA




    Architecture and Citizenship
    Scott Cryer | Carlos J. Moore Architect, P.A. | Charlotte, NC




    A Revolution is Not a Dinner Party
    Sevra Davis | Architectural Association, London | San Francisco, CA




    Value and Relevance
    Alex Gilliam | Charlottesville, VA




    Environmental Encourages a Broader Conception of Architecture: Inexperience as Opportunity
    Abram Goodrich | Studios Architecture | Washington, DC




    In Civic Defense – Enriching Architecture
    Aimee Goodwin | Lerner, Ladds + Bartels | Woonsocket, RI




    Challenging Assumptions
    Steven Feast | Perth, Australia




    What does an architect want to be?
    Jen Hendrich | Richmond, VA




    Don't Just Settle for Utopia: Making the Case for the Common Good
    Adam Hermanson | Burkett Design | Henderson, CO




    Booth: The critical process is essential to the built environment
    Aileen Iverson | Ellen Honigstock Architect PC | New York, NY




    A Struggle Against Boundless Impatience
    Chris Kryzanek | Neal Huston & Associates Architects | Bend, OR




    The Value of Architecture and Design as an Issue of Social Justice
    Juliet Lee | KieranTimberlake Associates | Philadelphia, PA




    "Everything in order tends to disorder," the role of architecture in the process of cause and effect
    Ana Maria Lopez | Archeon Group | Los Angeles, CA




    Do you speak Architecture?
    Eric McNeal | Architectural Workshop | Aurora, CO




    Using a Michael Graves Toilet Brush (A Design Aware General Public)
    Gavin Myers | Ashburn, VA




    Of Wine and Parking Lots
    Kisha Patterson | Buffalo, NY




    Mass Media and the Architect
    Andrea Ruedy | Goody Clancy & Associates | Cambridge, MA




    Bridging the Disconnect: Realigning the practice of architecture with worldly concerns
    Sanjit Roy | Baltimore, MD




    Personal Architecture
    Tyson Siegele | New York, NY




    Engaging the Everyday
    Hannah Teicher | UBC School of Architecture | Vancouver, BC




    Valor or Vanity, Contemporary Architecture of Fashionplate Victim?
    Kathryn Underwood | Cheltenham, Australia




    Foundations of Understanding
    Melissa Woehr | Charles R. Myer and Partners | Boston, MA




    Space of Representation
    Nicholas Woods | Johnsen Schmaling Architects | Milwaukee, WI




    What is Architecture?
    Dwight Yee | Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture | Pittsburgh, PA



Readers' Choice Winnders

Between March 25 and April 14, ArchVoices readers were invited to cast votes for up to three essays that they found to be the most intriguing, provocative, or well-written. The authors of the ten essays with the most votes were rewarded with a book trio of The Ethical Architect, Good Deeds, Good Design, and Proceed and Be Bold: Rural Studio After Samuel Mockbee, all compliments of Princeton Architectural Press.

Between March 25 and April 14, ArchVoices readers were invited to cast votes for up to three essays that they found to be the most intriguing, provocative, or well-written. The authors of the ten essays with the most votes were rewarded with a book trio of The Ethical Architect, Good Deeds, Good Design, and Proceed and Be Bold: Rural Studio After Samuel Mockbee, all compliments of Princeton Architectural Press.

    1. Daydreaming in Brick and Mortar

    2. Hope and Glory: Restoring the Public's Faith in Architecture

    3. Fall in Technology

    4. Of Wine and Parking Lots

    5. Improvement of the Status Quo

    6. Outlets Beyond the Obvious

    7. Collaborative Design: The New Alternative Practice

    8. The Public in Architecture

    9. Value and Relevance

    10. Spectacle and Consciousness: How Architects Must Overcome the System of Consumer Culture

      1. Fall in Technology

      2. The Porous Interface

      3. Identity Politics

      4. Spectacle and Consciousness: How Architects Must Overcome the System of Consumer Culture.

      5. Public Realities

      6. Sounding Architecture

      7. Reality Architecture

      8. Band-Aids and Bomb Shelters: questioning the everydayness of architecture.

      9. Outlets Beyond the Obvious

      10. Architecture & Democracy: Younger Minds for Larger responsibility

      11. Architecture and Constituency: Connecting to the Real World

      12. Self-evidence

      13. The Product of Problem

      14. Re-engaging Our Public

      15. Tall Ideals

      16. Campaigning for Architecture: the necessity to nurture Public Relations

      17. Culture/Public/Difference in Architecture

      18. Engaging the Public through Education

      19. Listening to Learn, Learning to Lead

      20. Shifting Identities

      21. The Societal Costs of Architectural Licensure

      22. To Engage the Public, Be Useful

      23. Communication, People and Architects

      24. Dance of a Dervish

      25. Engaging the public, the young architect's role and future

      26. On Not Being Invisible

      27. Our Response

      28. The Impact of Public Spaces

      29. Changing Life Through Design: The Continuing Challenge for the Built Environment.

      30. Architecture, the Architect and the People

      31. A Humble Plea

      32. Negotiating Community

      33. The value of architecture is right behind the spirit

      34. The Architect, The Academy, and The Profession

      35. The Measure of Success

      36. Re:connect - The Next Generation of Public Involvement

      37. The Architecture Office and the Community

      38. Architecture and Citizenship

      39. Achitecture as a human soul expresion is a human gift with a natural time.

      40. A Revolution is Not a Dinner Party

      41. Hope and Glory: Restoring the Public's Faith in Architecture

      42. The Brilliant Naïve

      43. Architecture: An Inclusive Art?

      44. Designing for architects

      45. Empowerment Through Architecture: The Need for a Paradigm Shift

      46. Architecture and Distraction

      47. Spreading the Word: Communicating Architecture Beyond the Profession

      48. Daydreaming in Brick and Mortar

      49. Challenging Assumptions

      50. The Limitations of the Digital Architect

      51. Building an Architectural Frame: The Process of Constructing an Engaging Built Environment

      52. Untitled

      53. Social Well-being: What Architecture is All About

      54. My Hope for Architecture

      55. Ode to a Caffeinated Culture

      56. Brick by Brick: Frame by Frame

      57. Viva La Revolution Spaceship Earth

      58. Think Globally, Act Locally

      59. Why My Mother Couldn't Edit This : Five Fragments in a Coded Language

      60. Value and Relevance

      61. Environmentalism Encourages a Broader Conception of Architecture: Inexperience as Opportunity

      62. In Civic Defense - Enriching Architecture

      63. Collaborative Design: melding visions

      64. Are architects responsible for space?

      65. Architects as Stewards

      66. The Myth of the Lone Architect

      67. Architect and Patron: A Creative Tradition

      68. Understanding the Local

      69. What does an architect want to be?

      70. Architecture | Tradition | Culture: Making the Case for the Common Good

      71. "Form Follows $$$" and "Function follows Form": The Death, Life AND Reincarnation of Great American Architecture

      72. The Architectural Divide

      73. Everything my neighbor knows, she learned from HGTV

      74. The Event and Aesthetics of Movement

      75. The Public in Architecture

      76. Sharing the Life and Environment

      77. A Social Engagement

      78. Booth: The critical process is essential to the built environment

      79. Expanding Role of Architects

      80. What was missing?

      81. The True Leaders of Architectural Culture

      82. Letter from a drop-out, or, responsibility begins at home.

      83. The Evolving Language of Architecture

      84. Time to Mingle

      85. Evolving Architect(ure)

      86. The Needs of Architecture

      87. Idea or character?

      88. Architecture's Second Power

      89. Communication and The Architect

      90. A Struggle Against Boundless Impatience

      91. Engaging Minds to Engage Society

      92. Our World, Our Selves

      93. The Missing Link : Sustainability

      94. Projecting

      95. Thousands of houses for poor people or a monument.

      96. Deaf Architect in Hearing World

      97. From Sandbox to Cell Phone: A Gentle Reminder of Why Architects Are Essential

      98. The Value of Architecture and Design as an Issue of Social Justice

      99. Architecture as a Conversation

      100. Gloria

      101. Today's Intern as Tomorrows Great Communicator: Finding the Path

      102. Communication and fashion: engaging the general public.

      103. Architecture by Numbers

      104. Perpetuation

      105. "Everything in order tends to disorder," the role of architecture in the process of cause and effect.

      106. Architectural Disengagement

      107. Lost Freedom

      108. Enhancing Experience

      109. Desperately Seeking Design Services

      110. Architecture and The Community

      111. Do you speak Architecture?

      112. Weaving Architecture Back Into Our Social Tapestry

      113. How Architecture Became a Generic Profession and How to Change that Perception.

      114. Architects vs. Public: Friends or Foe?

      115. Align

      116. The Architect's Equal

      117. Establishing a Palimpsest for Architectural Literacy

      118. Architecture's Role for Future Generations

      119. Architectural Discourse: Rejuvinating Public Life

      120. Architects and Society: A gap to fulfill

      121. Using a Michael Graves Toilet Brush: (A Design Aware General Public)

      122. Engaging Architecture's Image

      123. Communicating Between the Public and the Architect

      124. Partners at Large...

      125. Institutional Presence in the Community

      126. Of Wine and Parking Lots

      127. Promoting an Architecture of Sanity

      128. Creating Precedent: an Architecture of Outreach

      129. Bettering the Built Environment

      130. Working to Build Better Communities through Better Design

      131. Cultivating a Culture for Architecture

      132. The True Charm of our Profession: Engagement

      133. Revolutionary Architecture

      134. Connected Communication: Eyes and ears - hands and mouth

      135. Bridging the Disconnect: Realigning the Practice of Architecture with the Real World

      136. Mass Media and the Architect: The Power of Television and Film to Shape Public Perception and to Cultivate an Understanding of the Architect

      137. Eyes That Do Not See

      138. Beyond the grandeur to a true understanding

      139. Aesthetic v. Experience: The Struggle of Contemporary Architecture

      140. Humanizing Architecture through the Practice of Public Engagement

      141. Defining the Value of Design

      142. Architecture Will Not Sink Quietly Into the Ground

      143. The Realistic Education

      144. The 1-Dimensional Architect

      145. To See With Me

      146. Creating Poems in Stone

      147. Personal Architecture

      148. Can you say that again, in plain English this time, please?

      149. Image

      150. Publicity in architecture, Diversity matter!

      151. Men in Capes

      152. Lost in Communication

      153. Collaborative Design: The New Alternative Practice

      154. Can Cats understand Architecture?

      155. Live Together, Design Together

      156. Sell the Truth in Architecture

      157. Improvement of the Status Quo

      158. Latte Logic of the Status Quo

      159. Engaging the everyday

      160. Thinking/Speaking

      161. Towards A New Understanding

      162. Reforming the Role of Architecture

      163. Designs for a Community

      164. Valor or Vanity, Contemporary Architecture or Fashionplate Victim?

      165. Exposing Architecture

      166. Architects Aren't Doing Their Job

      167. Of Pluralistic Practices and Publics

      168. Architect...quintessential or disposable?

      169. Transitional Generation

      170. Will Engaging the Public Bring Architects More Jobs?

      171. Foundations of Understanding

      172. Architects: Knowledgeable Teachers...and Listeners

      173. Space of Representation

      174. From the Left to the Right: a Journey across the Canyon

      175. Language speaks : Architecture speaks

      176. What is Architecture?

      177. Crisis in Architecture: Role of Young Professional In Communicating Architecture to General Public

      178. Architecture Outreach Program for K-12

      179. The Virtual Reality Helmet: For a Client. For an Architect. For an Intern?




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